Entries Tagged as 'Training Tips'

The Visual Tool Kit: How vision can improve your performance on Race Day

Training Tips , Wildflower 1 Comment »

Jesse Thomas AviatorsAs triathletes, we pride ourselves on coordinating all aspects of our kit, from shoes and visors to handlebar tape and water bottles. Jesse Thomas has his signature aviators, and whether you are a FOP or BOP athlete, we each have our own “style”. Sunglasses are an integral accessory to any kit, but aside from looking stylish, they are extremely important to your safety and performance in races. Less than an inch behind the lenses are two of the most important organs in our body that allow us to navigate the course from start to finish. Protecting your eyes and utilizing the correct eye wear can give you an edge on your competitors, if you understand how to incorporate lens technology in with your racing and training.

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How I Bought 30 Watts for $250

Athlete Stories , Training Tips 1 Comment »

What if it where possible to gain 20-30 watts on the bike for a very small investment? Say in the range of $200-$300. I’m sure most of you would agree this is a no brainer investment. In an era were $8k bikes, $3k wheels and $400 helmets are common place, a $250 bike fit SHOULD be a no brainer. Especially if a proven gain of 25 watts waits for you on the other end. Here is my story.

I took up racing triathlon about 3 years ago after many years of racing mountain bikes.  At the beginning of my triathlon racing I was met with some bike problems. I am fortunate enough to have power on both my road bike and my tri bike and because of this I was able to see some disturbing power discrepancies between the two.

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Balancing Triathlon and Family

Training Tips 2 Comments »

Trying to fit exercise into your daily routine can be a challenge, add work and family into the equation and it can pose an even bigger challenge. I’m writing this blog to tell you that it can be done and you don’t need to feel like your life is spinning out of control while doing it (although sometimes on really bad days it may feel like it).

My husband (Joe) began consistently training for triathlons 3 years ago. What I mean by “consistently” would be working out every day, one or two times a daily. I didn’t mind it really. Most days he completed one of his workouts before the kids and I got out of bed in the morning. The other workout was done around our family schedule. I was strictly running at the time and was not interested in doing triathlons, so I would usually run when he arrived home from his early morning workout. This is how our household ran BEFORE I started triathlons. Now for the past 2 years my husband and I both try to fit in our daily workouts, work, and raise our 2 boys together. Some of the things that we found helpful are as follows:

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Triathlete’s Hardest Skill: Listening to your Body

Nutrition , Training Tips No Comments »

Wattie Ink

By: James Adams

In the triathlon world we listen and read so much about swimming, biking and running. We learn how to improve our technique, aerodynamics, workouts, gear, nutrition, etc, etc. We spend hundreds sometimes thousands of dollars to get that extra edge - ANYTHING to take that extra time off of your PR or gain that "free speed." Triathlon is a business just like anything else out there and you have to be careful of buying into all of the hype, gear and trends that can break your bank if you're not careful. The good news is, the single most important thing to get you faster in triathlon is free. Listen to your body! The body has an amazing way of giving you signals on whether to back off or push it. It can save you from injury, sickness and burnout; which can be the fall of any triathlete whether you're experienced or a newbie. As typical "Type A" personalities it can be often hard to coach or listen to the advice but if you look for the cues it can save you days/months of missed training. So what are the cues?

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Triathlon Camp Nutrition Tips for Triathletes – Part 2

Coach Ben Greenfield , Training Tips 1 Comment »

Top 20 Fueling MythsIn the last article, you learned about why you should fuel differently when you go to a triathlon camp (like the upcoming Wildflower training camps coming April 5-7).

During my time spent at triathlon camps, I have developed four crucial guidelines to assist in high-volume meal planning and daily nutrition.

1. Prioritize Activity-Based Fueling. When your body is active and engaged in exercise, with blood flowing and the heart beating rapidly, your cells become more insulin sensitive. This means that your pancreas does not produce such an enormous surge of insulin in response to high sugar and calorie intake, and your body is more likely to utilize circulating blood sugar for energy, rather than convert it into circulating triglycerides (packaged fats) in the liver. This window of insulin sensitivity ranges from 5-10 minutes prior to beginning and training session, during the training session, and up to 20-30 minutes afterwards. Based on this concept, you should choose the sweetest, most calorie dense fuels and actually consume them immediately before, during and after a training session. This means that packaged gummy sugar bites or gooey morsels of chocolate should be eaten only during the training window, and not while lounging on the couch at the end of the day, or sitting in a transport vehicle 45 minutes before a session. Some of my athletes refer to this guideline as “saving your sugar”. If you want a very slow release fuel, then check out this article, in which I describe my personal race day fueling protocol, which also works very well on long training days.

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